ALL the foremost papers of December 10, naturally centered at the 61st anniversary of the Independence of Tanzania Mainland, then referred to as Tanganyika.

The Daily Blog had this entrance web page information merchandise titled “Tanzania @61: Let us focus on development – Samia”, the place Her Excellency the President is quoted as calling on Tanzanians: “to continue upholding the national unity, peace and love … .and to maintain focus on strategies that will help in taking the country to ‘a’ next level of development”.

Here, I feel, it’s best to speak of “the next level of development”, as an alternative of: “a next level of development”.

She is quoted additional as pronouncing: “We have had a journey of challenges and many successes that the country is ‘bragging’ on”. “Brag” isn’t the precise verb to make use of in those cases and here’s why. “To brag means to talk about your achievements or possessions in a proud way that annoys other people”.

Surely, we don’t need to annoy people after we communicate of our achievements since Independence. Instead of “brag”, I might opt for the adjective “proud of”‘.

The sentence would then learn as follows: “We have had a journey of challenges and many successes that the country is ‘proud of'”. The Vice President additionally issued a remark in which he reminded Tanzanians: “on the importance of ‘conserving environment’ for the benefit of current and future generations”. We are lacking the particular article “the” in this citation.

The VP reminded Tanzanians: “on the importance of conserving ‘the’ environment”. Goes at the creator: “Usually the country marks Independence Day with special parade, ‘pomp funfair’ and with huge convoys of former leaders … … “. The phrase “funfair” does exist, however it’s perhaps now not the proper one to make use of right here. Instead, I counsel “fanfare”; particularly: “pomp and fanfare”. This 12 months, then again, consistent with the creator: “funds ‘allocated’ for the event were instead used to construct dormitories”.

The verb “allocate” denotes a certain task that has already been determined upon and achieved. That is why I might opt for a verb, other from “allocate”. “Earmark” is my selection: “Funds ‘earmarked’ for the event were instead used to construct dormitories”.

The quantity 61, has extra importance than simply denoting the selection of years that Tanzania has been impartial. The creator quotes one educational: “When we got independence there were about 10 million Tanzanians, but now ‘we have reach’ 61 million”.